HOME | British foreign travel advice

 

Singapore
UK foreign office news & advice

Latest travel advice for Singapore including safety and security, entry requirements, travel warnings and health

2016-12-20T16:17:00.161+00:00: Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment

Haze can affect air quality in Singapore. You should monitor the Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) updates and health advisories from the Singapore government. See Health

It’s illegal to drink alcohol in public places (eg beyond the premises of bars and restaurants) from 10.30pm to 7am and all day at weekends in certain areas. Offenders will be fined. See Local laws and customs

Don’t become involved with drugs of any kind. Possession of even very small quantities can lead to imprisonment, corporal punishment or the death penalty.

There is a general threat from terrorism. See Terrorism

The offence of ‘outrage of modesty’ (molestation) can result in a fine, jail or corporal punishment. Scams involving false claims of molest are thought to exist. See Local laws and customs

UK health authorities have classified Singapore as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Dengue fever is known or has the potential to occur in Singapore. See Health

Around 450,000 British tourists visit Singapore every year. Most visits are trouble-free.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.

Safety and security

Crime

Be aware of the risk of street crime, particularly bag snatching. Take particular care of your passport. Leave valuables in a hotel safe if possible. Don’t leave valuables in unattended vehicles.

Violent crime is rare.

Road travel

Road conditions in Singapore are generally good. If you are involved in an accident, you should remain at the scene until the police have arrived.

You can drive in Singapore using a UK driving licence for up to 1 year. If you are staying in Singapore for longer than 1 year or become a Permanent Resident you should get a Singaporean driving licence.

Driving under the influence of alcohol is a serious offence in Singapore. The traffic police regularly carry out breath tests. Sentences can include a fine or imprisonment. 

Air travel

The Singaporean authorities will prosecute cases of air rage within their jurisdiction.

Sea travel

There have been attacks against ships in and around the waters of Singapore and the Malacca Straits. Be vigilant and take appropriate precautions. Reduce opportunities for theft, establish secure areas onboard and report all incidents to the coastal and flag state authorities.

Terrorism

There is a general threat from terrorism. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places visited by foreigners. The Singaporean government has put in place extensive measures to combat terrorism and has arrested a number of terrorist suspects.

There is considered to be a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Find out more about the global threat from terrorism, how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack.

Local laws and customs

The death penalty exists for certain offences, including murder and drug trafficking. There are severe penalties for all drug offences in Singapore. Trafficking is defined by possession of drugs above a certain amount (500g in the case of cannabis).

As of 1 April 2015, it’s illegal to drink alcohol in a public place between 10.30pm and 7am. You can drink alcohol between these hours in restaurants, bars and cafes, the outdoor areas of private condominiums and chalets, and outdoor events that have obtained a permit. Geylang and Little India are designated as ‘Liquor Control Zones’ where drinking in public places is prohibited all weekend, on public holidays and the eve of public holidays. You could be fined up to SG$1,000 (approximately £500). Repeat offenders may be fined up to SG$2,000 (approximately £1,000) or sent to prison for up to 3 months. Drunk and disorderly conduct are treated seriously, and can lead to a fine or being sent to prison.

You can’t bring vaporisers, like e-cigarettes, e-pipes, e-cigars, and refills into the country. These items are likely to be confiscated, and you could be fined or sent to prison.

Penalties for overstaying your visa include fines, imprisonment, corporal punishment (the rattan cane) and deportation depending on the length of overstay.

A wide range of offences, including ‘outrage of modesty’ (inappropriate behaviour by men towards women) and vandalism carry corporal punishment (the rattan cane).

You should avoid any action that could be interpreted as molestation. Scams involving false claims of molestation are thought to exist. Usually once the complaint is made by the victim and the accused is arrested the police will not allow the accused person to travel and their passport will be confiscated while investigations are carried out. This can take several months.

A police permit is required for any outdoor public assembly or procession. You should avoid street gatherings and public demonstrations as they might be illegal. Filming an illegal public gathering is also forbidden, as is the wearing or displaying of any ‘cause related’ material without permission.

Approval from the  Ministry of Manpower is required for a foreign national to give a talk on ‘racial, communal, religious, caused-related or political topics’.

The public display of national flags or national emblems is illegal except where a specific exemption has been granted.

Male homosexual acts are illegal in Singapore, but in a statement to Parliament in 2007 Singapore’s Prime Minister stated that ‘The Government does not act as moral policemen’ and that ‘we do not proactively enforce’ the law on this issue. Openly gay and lesbian support groups and social venues exist.

Both public and private Jehovah’s Witness meetings are illegal in Singapore. It is also against the law to possess any Jehovah’s Witness publication, including a Jehovah’s Witness bible. Similar measures exist against the Unification Church.

On-the-spot fines are common, and can be given for a wide range of behaviours which are tolerated in the UK. You’ll be fined for littering and smoking in some public places. It’s also illegal to bring chewing gum into the country, except for certain medical chewing gums.

Thorough checks may be carried out on departing travellers’ vehicles and fingerprints may be scanned at border exit points.

The use of false ID is illegal.

There is zero tolerance for bribery. Any attempt to bribe or to otherwise prevent an official from carrying out their duties can result in arrest.

Dual nationals and Permanent Residents

Singapore does not recognise dual nationality beyond the age of 21. All male citizens of Singapore are liable for National Service. All male children granted Permanent Resident status as part of their parent’s Permanent Resident application are also liable for national service. National Service is normally served for a period of 2 years from the age of 18, with additional reservist requirements lasting until the age of 40 (50 in the case of officers).

From the age of 13, male Singapore citizens and permanent residents must apply for an exit permit to travel outside Singapore for 3 months or more. On reaching 16 ½ years of age all male Singapore citizens and Singapore Permanent Residents must register for National Service.

A minor citizen (defined as below the age of 21 years) is allowed to hold dual citizenship until the age of 21 whereupon they are required to relinquish either one of their citizenships. A minor citizen can’t renounce their Singapore citizenship when they are below 21 years of age and their parents cannot renounce their child’s Singapore citizenship on their behalf.

If a male child holds dual citizenship and wishes to renounce his Singaporean citizenship without serving National Service it may be possible for his parents to ask the Singapore government to first defer his National Service until he reaches 21, depending on the specific circumstances. In 2006 the then Minister of Defence told the Singapore parliament that “only those who have emigrated at a young age and have not enjoyed substantial socio-economic benefits are allowed to renounce their citizenship without serving National Service”.

Specific questions regarding National Service issues can be put to Singapore’s Central Manpower base: contact@ns.sg 

For further information see the following websites for Singapore - Immigration and Checkpoints Authority and  Ministry of Defence (MINDEF).

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

You don’t normally need a visa to enter Singapore for stays of up to 30 days for tourism, business discussions or social visits. Women who are more than six months pregnant no longer need to get permission before travelling, but the final decision on the length of stay permitted rests with the immigration officer on arrival. Prior entry clearance is required for women intending to give birth in Singapore. You can apply at the  High Commission for the Republic of Singapore in London or the nearest Singapore Embassy/High Commission if you’re not in the UK.

Passport validity

Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of entry into Singapore. If you are intending to transit Singapore to neighbouring countries, make sure your passport is valid for at least 6 months. You may be refused entry or turned away by airlines if your passport does not meet this requirement.

Customs regulations

Importing certain controlled drugs and pirated copyright material is prohibited and there are restrictions on entering with items like replica guns, radio communications equipment, and weapons and ammunition (including empty cartridge cases and air guns). For more information visit the travellers section of the Singapore Customs government website.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

Check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website.

Medication

Some prescribed and over the counter medicines available in the UK are considered controlled substances in Singapore. You must apply for prior authorisation and a permit at least ten working days before your travel date from the Singapore Health Sciences Authority in order to bring any such medication into Singapore. For medicines that do not contain a controlled substance, you may bring up to three months’ supply into Singapore without prior approval, but must bring supporting documents such as a letter from your doctor or a copy of the prescription as proof that the medicines are for your personal use. For more information, please consult the Health Sciences Authority website. If you have questions please email hsa_info@hsa.gov.sg

Arriving from the Middle East

If you’re arriving from an airport in the Middle East, you may be subject to screening for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). If you display symptoms, you may face quarantine or further testing.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Singapore. Your ETD should be valid for a period of at least 6 months. No visa is required on an ETD when entering or transiting Singapore.

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

Healthcare in Singapore is of a high quality and expensive. You should take enough medication to cover your stay and carry it in your hand baggage. Not all UK prescribed drugs are available in Singapore. Some over-the-counter medications like Ibuprofen need a prescription. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

From June to October Singapore can experience high levels of pollution (haze) from land clearance fires in Indonesia. The haze can cause disruption to local and regional air travel, and the air pollution may have an impact on public health. Keep up-to-date with local information and seek medical advice on appropriate precautions. You should monitor the Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) updates and health advisories from the Singapore government.

Mosquito-borne illnesses like dengue fever and chikungunya virus occur all year round. You should take appropriate precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

UK health authorities have classified Singapore as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is common in Singapore with more serious outbreaks from time to time. Young children are particularly at risk.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 995 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Money

The local currency is the Singapore Dollar. Major credit cards are accepted in most hotels, restaurants and department stores. Credit card fraud is not a major problem in Singapore, but you should check your statements carefully.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send us a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.

See also

Connect with me socially@

Select a country below:

  • British High Commission Singapore

    Title:British High Commission Singapore
    Email:enquiries.singapore@fco.gov.uk
    Address:

    100 Tanglin Road
    Singapore 247919
    Singapore

    Contact: Telephone: (65) 6424 4200
    Visas services: https://www.gov.uk/contact-ukvi-outside-uk
    Visiting:Opening hours (except Office & Public Holidays): all Local times


    CONSULAR
    Monday to Friday - 9:00 am to 11:00 am excluding public holidays
    Email consular.singapore@fco.gov.uk
    BY APPOINTMENT

    OFFICE
    Monday to Friday - 8:30 am to 5:00 pm excluding public holidays
    Services:Emergency Travel Documents service (Assistance Services)
    Births and Deaths registration service (Documentary Services)
    Citizenship Ceremony service (Documentary Services)
    Legalisation Service (Other Services)
    Notarial services (Documentary Services)
    Lost or Stolen Passports (Assistance Services)
    Registrations of Marriage and Civil Partnerships (Documentary Services)
    Issue certificate of no impediment (Documentary Services)
  • Department for International Trade Singapore

    Title:Department for International Trade Singapore
    Email:commercial.singapore@fco.gov.uk
    Address:

    British High Commission
    100 Tanglin Road
    247919
    Singapore

    Contact: Enquiries: +65 6424 4200
    Visiting:
    Services:
  • UK Science and Innovation Network

    Title:
    Email:
    Address:
    Contact:
    Visiting:
    Services:
  • UK Science and Innovation Network in Singapore

    Title:
    Email:
    Address:
    Contact:
    Visiting:
    Services:

Currency converter for
Singapore

Lastest travel news for
Singapore

Images from
Singapore


from flickr

International
telephone dialing codes

Find your nearest
British Embassy worldwide

Lastest travel alerts
Foreign & Commonwealth Office

  • USA
    2017-03-27T09:07
    Latest update: Summary – the US government has implemented additional security measures ...
  • Australia
    2017-03-27T00:26
    Latest update: Summary - Tropical Cyclone Debbie is forecast to cross the Queensland coast ...
  • Russia
    2017-03-26T14:25
    Latest update: Summary - Sunday March 26th. There are several large demonstrations in ...
  • Bangladesh
    2017-03-26T11:01
    Latest update: Summary - there is an ongoing security incident in the Shibbari area of ...
  • Tunisia
    2017-03-26T00:38
    Latest update: Summary – there’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation; the ...
  • Turkey
    2017-03-26T00:34
    Latest update: Summary – there’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation; the ...
  • Saudi Arabia
    2017-03-26T00:27
    Latest update: Summary – there’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation; the ...
  • Lebanon
    2017-03-26T00:22
    Latest update: Summary – there’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation; the ...
  • Jordan
    2017-03-26T00:17
    Latest update: Summary – there’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation; the ...
  • Egypt
    2017-03-26T00:10
    Latest update: Summary – there’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation; the ...
  • Brazil
    2017-03-24T17:38
    Latest update: Summary - large-scale protests planned for Sunday 26 March 2017, in major ...
  • Malaysia
    2017-03-24T15:55
    Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment
  • Japan
    2017-03-24T10:22
    Latest update: Summary - updated number of British nationals visiting Japan
  • Slovakia
    2017-03-23T17:30
    Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment
  • Ecuador
    2017-03-23T17:17
    Latest update: editorial amendments
  • Dominica
    2017-03-23T16:52
    Latest update: minor editorial amendment
  • Belize
    2017-03-23T16:28
    Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment
  • Costa Rica
    2017-03-23T14:57
    Latest update: Summary – updated number of British nationals visiting Costa Rica ...
  • Nicaragua
    2017-03-23T14:42
    Latest update: Summary - removal of information and advice in the aftermath of Hurricane ...
  • Latvia
    2017-03-23T14:40
    Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment

The latest news, travel advice, and information for Singapore, updated regularly for all British travellers by the UK Foreign Office. Including British consulate and embassy addresses in Singapore (Singapore).

Travel news, alerts, advice and information for other countries:

Source: UK Foreign Office | Google News | Flickr | World weather online | Website development company
Sponsors: Online backup | Hospitality jobs in singapore | Desktop support Berkshire.
Contains FCO/Directgov data © Crown copyright and database right.

British foreign travel advice and information

Money transfers and currency exchanges