HOME | British foreign travel advice

 

Liberia
UK foreign office news & advice

2016-12-21T15:52:47.896+00:00: Latest update: minor editorial amendments

The World Health Organisation declared Liberia Ebola transmission free on 9 June 2016 following a new and contained outbreak on 31 March 2016. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office no longer advise against all but essential travel to Liberia. You should check this travel advice carefully before planning any travel to Liberia, and continue to take health precautions. See Health

There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places visited by foreigners. There may be heightened security at hotels in Liberia, following the terrorist attacks on hotels in Bamako, Mali on 20 November 2015, and Ouagadougou, Burkina Fason on 15 January 2016 and in Grand Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire on 13 March 2016. You should be vigilant after recent attacks, especially in places visited by foreigners. See Terrorism

Getting medical care in Liberia may be difficult because the health infrastructure has been severely strained by the Ebola outbreak. Although separate treatment facilities were set up to respond to the Ebola outbreak, general medical facilities throughout Liberia are unable to provide the same standard of healthcare as in the UK. and in rural areas are rudimentary. Many medical facilities expect to be paid up-front for treatment. If you travel to Liberia, stay in contact with your employer or host organisation about the support that they can provide to you while you’re in the country.

If you’re concerned that you might have been exposed to, or showing symptoms of Ebola, you should seek immediate medical advice. If you’re in the UK call NHS on 111.

Avoid travelling at night outside Monrovia, except to or from Roberts International Airport. Make sure you have pre-arranged transport from the airport. See Crime and Road Travel

The small British Embassy in Monrovia can only offer limited consular assistance.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.

Safety and security

Local Travel

There are sometimes clashes between armed groups from both sides of the Liberian/Cote d’Ivoire border in some of the more remote border areas of Grand Gedeh and River Gee counties. To avoid straying into these areas, use the main roads when travelling in these counties.

The ability of the national authorities and the UN to provide emergency help outside Monrovia is limited. Check the security situation before travelling to any part of the country. Violent incidents, particularly in rural areas, are possible as a result of land disputes, illegal mining and occupation of rubber plantations. Illegal rubber tappers have been responsible for a number of attacks on security forces in the Firestone rubber plantation. Avoid travelling away from the major routes within the plantation. Organised groups of former combatants may be present in areas of the country where there is limited government security presence, including Sinoe rubber plantation and Sapo National Park.

The Samuel K Doe Stadium in Monrovia can become overcrowded during major football matches or events.

Crime

There is a high level of crime in Monrovia, including armed robbery. The Liberian National Police has very limited capability to prevent or detect crime, or to provide emergency response in any part of the country. Levels of crime are much higher after dark. Don’t walk anywhere in the city at night.

Take care when walking alone and only do so during daylight hours in areas frequented by foreigners.

Most crime is opportunistic theft, but there are organised criminal gangs. Thieves are often armed with knives or machetes, but occasionally also carry firearms. While Liberians are the main victims of crime, the relative wealth of international visitors makes them an attractive target for criminals. Avoid carrying valuables in public and be vigilant at all times, especially at night. Mobile phones and laptops are common targets of theft.

Foreigners have been mugged in the Mamba Point and Sinkor areas of Monrovia (including Sinkor beach in broad daylight), where most international visitors stay. Be wary if you are approached by strangers. Criminals also operate in nightclubs and on beaches.

Accommodation occupied by international workers has occasionally been targeted by burglars. Thefts have occurred in taxis. You should avoid local public transport. There is a high incidence of rape in Liberia and there have been cases of rapes and attempted rapes involving foreign women.

Take extra care when driving in heavy traffic or off the main roads.

Consider your security arrangements carefully before your arrival in Liberia. Make sure you are supported by a reliable organisation with a comprehensive and adequate security plan. Stay only in reputable accommodation with adequate guarding and other security arrangements, and arrange for transport for the duration of your stay, including travel to and from the airport. Roberts International Airport is around 30 miles from central Monrovia, much of the journey passing through rural areas.

Road Travel

The roads from Monrovia to Roberts International Airport, the port town of Buchanan and to the border with Sierra Leone at Bo Waterside, and to the border with Guinea at Ganta are mainly paved and in reasonable condition. Most other roads outside Monrovia are unpaved. Driving and road conditions deteriorate significantly during the rainy season (May to November), and many roads may become impassable.

Avoid travelling at night outside Monrovia, except to or from Roberts International Airport. Roads are treacherous and all roads are unlit. Vehicles often do not have lights. You are more vulnerable to being robbed at an illegal check point at night.

Make precautionary arrangements for dealing with breakdowns, including considering travel with more than one vehicle. Traffic accidents can quickly draw hostile crowds, who may attempt to take justice into their own hands. Use a local driver outside Monrovia rather than driving yourself.

The standard of driving is generally poor. Be particularly alert to dangers from other vehicles swerving to avoid potholes and from taxis slowing or stopping unpredictably to pick up or drop off passengers and motorcycle taxis ‘Pein-Peins’ (the main cause of road accidents). Motorcycle taxis are very dangerous.

Be prepared to stop at checkpoints operated by the Liberian National Police, or other Liberian security authorities, which are found on roads throughout the country. Pull over to the side of the road immediately when instructed by security forces accompanying VIP convoys.

Air Travel

All airlines from Liberia have been refused permission to operate services to the EU because Liberia is unable to ensure that its airlines meet international safety standards. There are no commercial operators of domestic flights within Liberia.

River and Sea Travel

Liberia has many attractive beaches, but the Atlantic Ocean is subject to rip tides and other dangerous currents. Swimmers should take care and seek local advice before entering the water. Avoid canoes and fishing boats offering passenger services. They are regularly overwhelmed by strong waves and currents.

Political Situation

The British Embassy re-opened in Monrovia on 18 March 2013.

Liberia has become increasing stable since the internal conflict ended in 2003, but the security situation remains fragile and has deteriorated because of the Ebola outbreak. The Liberian government is working closely with the UN and the international community to provide increased stability and development.

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor is serving a long prison sentence in the UK following his conviction by the Special Court for Sierra Leone. Taylor’s supporters have warned that UK travellers in Liberia may be at risk of reprisal. You should be vigilant and avoid discussing political issues.

Terrorism

There is an underlying threat from terrorism.

As seen in Mali, Côte D’Ivoire and Burkina Faso, terrorist groups continue to mount attacks on beach resorts, hotels, cafés and restaurants visited by foreigners. Be especially vigilant in these locations.

There is considered to be a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Find out more about the global threat from terrorism, how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack.

Local laws and customs

Don’t become involved with drugs of any kind.

If you commit a criminal offence, including drug trafficking and diamond smuggling you can expect to be subjected to local law. There are heavy penalties for those convicted. Local prison conditions are harsh.

Homosexuality is illegal.

Carry photographic identification with you at all times, you may be asked to produce it at any time by immigration officials or the police.

The government office responsible for adoptions in Liberia is the Ministry of Justice. All petitions for adoption are filed in the Probate Court, which issues a decree of adoption if all legal requirements are met. Adoption orders from Liberia are not recognised in the UK. Liberian nationals require a visa to enter the UK. If you are returning to live in the UK, you will need to apply for entry clearance for the child as a child coming for adoption in the UK.

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

British nationals need a visa to enter Liberia. You can get a visa from the Embassy of the Republic of Liberia in London.

Passport Validity

Your passport should be valid for the proposed duration of your stay. No additional period of validity beyond this is required.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) aren’t valid for entry into Liberia. However, ETDs are accepted for airside transit and exit from Liberia.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

Check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website.

Registration of residents

If you are intending to live in Liberia, you will need to register with the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization (BIN), Broad Street, Monrovia. Visitors do not need to register with the BIN.

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

Malaria is a serious problem throughout Liberia, including in Monrovia.

Hospitals and medical facilities throughout Liberia are poorly equipped. There are no emergency services. Blood supplies are unreliable and unsafe, and medication is scarce. There is no effective public or commercial accident and emergency or ambulance service anywhere in the country. You should carry basic medical supplies. Ensure you have adequate supplies of prescription medication, bearing in mind the risk of delays due to flight cancellations. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad, medical evacuation and repatriation. 

The 2012 UNAIDS Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic estimated that around 18,000 adults aged 15 or over in Liberia were living with HIV; the prevalence percentage was estimated at around 0.9% of the adult population compared to the prevalence percentage in adults in the UK of around 0.25%.  You should exercise normal precautions to avoid exposure to HIV/AIDS.

Money

Credit cards are not accepted in Liberia and very few outlets will accept travellers’ cheques. Several cash machines/ATMs accepting only Visa cards now operate in Monrovia, including in the two main hotels frequented by international visitors, but foreign exchange and banking facilities remain limited. Western Union and Moneygram have a number of agents in Liberia who are able to transfer money from the UK, although there are very few outside Monrovia. Bring sufficient funds, in US Dollars cash, to cover all expenses.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send us a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.

See also

Connect with me socially@

Select a country below:

  • British Embassy Monrovia

    Title:British Embassy Monrovia
    Email:Monrovia.GeneralEnquiries@fco.gov.uk
    Address:

    Leone Compound, 12th Street Beach-side,
    Sinkor,
    Monrovia
    Monrovia
    Liberia

    Contact: Telephone: +231 (0) 777530320
    Consular assistance (24 hour): +44 (0)1908 516 666
    Visiting:
    Services:
  • DFID Sierra Leone

    Title:DFID Sierra Leone
    Email:sl-enquiries@dfid.gov.uk
    Address:

    5 Off Spur Road
    Wilberforce
    Freetown
    Sierra Leone

    Contact: Tel: +232 22 233 620
    Fax: +232 22 235 769
    Visiting:
    Services:

Currency converter for
Liberia

Lastest travel news for
Liberia

Images from
Liberia


from flickr

International
telephone dialing codes

Find your nearest
British Embassy worldwide

Lastest travel alerts
Foreign & Commonwealth Office

  • France
    2017-04-28T13:17
    Latest update: Summary – there are plans for a political rally in central Paris, ...
  • French Guiana
    2017-04-28T11:56
    Latest Update: Summary – removal of information on reports of unrest and strike action ...
  • The Occupied Palestinian Territories
    2017-04-27T14:14
    Latest update: Summary & terrorism sections – updated information and advice about the ...
  • Israel
    2017-04-27T13:59
    Latest update: Summary & terrorism sections – updated information and advice about the ...
  • Bahrain
    2017-04-27T12:31
    Latest update: Safety and security section - information about demonstrations planned on ...
  • Brazil
    2017-04-27T11:56
    Latest update: Summary – large-scale strikes and protests are planned for Friday 28 April ...
  • Spain
    2017-04-27T10:39
    Latest update: Summary – Manchester United take on Celta de Vigo in the Europa League on ...
  • Romania
    2017-04-27T09:27
    Latest update: Summary – removal of information about demonstrations in response to ...
  • New Zealand
    2017-04-26T15:58
    Latest update: Summary and Terrorism section – updated information and advice about the ...
  • Australia
    2017-04-26T15:52
    Latest update: Summary and Terrorism section - updated information and advice about the ...
  • Sweden
    2017-04-26T15:51
    Latest update: Summary and Terrorism section – updated information and advice about the ...
  • Bhutan
    2017-04-26T15:26
    Latest update: minor editorial amendments
  • Greece
    2017-04-25T16:23
    Latest update: Summary – the Panhellenic Seamen’s Federation (PNO) has announced a 24 ...
  • Moldova
    2017-04-25T14:54
    Latest update: Summary - removal of information and advice about severe winter weather ...
  • Burundi
    2017-04-25T10:42
    Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment
  • Rwanda
    2017-04-25T10:42
    Latest update: this advice has been reviewed and re-issued without amendment
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
    2017-04-25T10:35
    Latest update – Safety & security section (Getting to St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da ...
  • El Salvador
    2017-04-25T10:04
    Latest update: Local laws and customs section – information and advice for LGBT ...
  • Western Sahara
    2017-04-25T09:51
    Latest update: Summary and Terrorism section - updated information and advice about the ...
  • Mauritania
    2017-04-25T09:47
    Latest update: Summary and Terrorism section - updated information and advice about the ...

The latest news, travel advice, and information for Liberia, updated regularly for all British travellers by the UK Foreign Office. Including British consulate and embassy addresses in Liberia (Monrovia).

Travel news, alerts, advice and information for other countries:

Source: UK Foreign Office | Google News | Flickr | World weather online | Website development company
Sponsors: Online backup | Hospitality jobs in liberia | Desktop support Berkshire.
Contains FCO/Directgov data © Crown copyright and database right.

British foreign travel advice and information

Money transfers and currency exchanges