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Latest travel advice for Chile including safety and security, entry requirements, travel warnings and health

2017-03-28T20:34:50.257+01:00: Latest update: Summary - there have been violent incidents in Santiago and Valparaiso on 29 March in previous years related to the anniversary of the Day of the Young Combatant (Día del Joven Combatiente). Incidents occurred in downtown Santiago, in Huechuraba, Peñalolén, Estación Central, La Florida, La Pintana, San Bernardo, Cerro Navia, Quilicura, Puente Alto and Renca. Avoid these areas on 29 March as well as outlying parts of Santiago and Valparaiso, particularly at night when incidents of violence may escalate

There have been violent incidents in Santiago and Valparaiso on 29 March in previous years related to the anniversary of the Day of the Young Combatant (Día del Joven Combatiente). Incidents occurred in downtown Santiago, in Huechuraba, Peñalolén, Estación Central, La Florida, La Pintana, San Bernardo, Cerro Navia, Quilicura, Puente Alto and Renca. Avoid these areas on 29 March as well as outlying parts of Santiago and Valparaiso, particularly at night when incidents of violence may escalate.

Around 80,000 British nationals visit Chile each year. Most visits to Chile are trouble-free. Opportunistic street crime can be a problem in towns and cities, and in areas popular with tourists.

Take care of your personal belongings at all times and be aware of your surroundings. Carry a photocopy of your passport and keep the original document in a safe place. See Crime

There is an underlying threat from terrorism. See Terrorism

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.

Safety and security

Crime

Pick pocketing and muggings are common in many cities throughout Chile, particularly around well-known tourist sites, bus stations and areas visited by foreigners. Pay particular attention to your belongings in popular foreign cafes and restaurants where there has been an increase in bag theft.

Don’t put any valuables in the storage compartments of buses and coaches - keep them with you at all times.

Book a taxi in advance rather than hailing one from the street, especially late at night. Keep in groups and don’t walk alone late at night.

There have been a few reports of people being given ‘spiked’ drinks in nightclubs and bars, particularly in the Suecia and Bellavista areas of Santiago. These can leave the victim open to theft or assault.

Leave your passport and other valuables in a safe place and carry a photocopy of the details page of your passport with you at all times.

Local travel

Landmine accidents mainly affect livestock and local people crossing borders at unauthorised points. Most minefields are near the borders with Peru and Bolivia in the extreme north of Chile (regions XV, I and II) and Argentina in the south (region XII). Although most minefields are clearly marked, some signs and fences are old and damaged, and may be hard to spot. In some cases, minefields are laid right up to the edge of highways. Check with local authorities before travelling to more rural areas, stick to clearly marked roads and observe all warning signs.

If travelling to national parks in Chile you are advised that open fires (outside permitted camping areas) are strictly forbidden. Local authorities may revoke tourist permits from anyone caught starting a fire within a Chilean National Park and ask them to leave Chile voluntarily within 72 hours or face deportation. Additionally, if the open fire results in a larger forest fire, there may also be criminal penalties and fines.

If you plan to go exploring or mountaineering, notify the local authorities before you set off. For further information on mountaineering, contact the Federación de Andinismo de Chile, Almirante Simpson 77, Santiago, Chile, Telephone: (56 2) 2220888.  For any other type of exploring, contact the Chilean Embassy in London, to see if permits are required. There are good rescue facilities in Chile.  You may be charged for the service they provide.

Road travel

You can use your UK driving licence while in Chile if you’re visiting as a tourist. You must have your passport and entrance card with you while driving. If you hire a car, take out adequate insurance including for windscreen damage, which can be expensive.

If you’re resident in Chile you must get a Chilean driving licence from the nearest ‘municipalidad’. You can find further information about the process here and here

There is no car insurance available on Easter Island. In case of accidents or any damage to your vehicle, you will have to pay for the repairs yourself.

Main roads in Chile are surfaced, but you may need a four-wheel drive vehicle in the countryside. Be prepared for a range of driving conditions, from snow and ice to hot sandy deserts. Road tolls are increasingly common. Between June and September, winter weather sometimes temporarily closes the Chile-Argentina border crossing high up in the Andes, including the main Los Libertadores crossing between Santiago and Mendoza.

Air travel

The FCO can’t offer advice on the safety of individual airlines, but the International Air Transport Association publishes a list of registered airlines that have been audited and found to meet a number of operational safety standards and recommended practices. This list is not exhaustive and the absence of an airline from this list does not necessarily mean that it is unsafe.

A list of recent incidents and accidents can be found on the website of the Aviation Safety network.

Political situation

Nationwide protests often take place on 11 September (anniversary of the military coup), 29 March (‘day of the young combatant’) and 1 May (Workers’ Day). Even peaceful protests can become violent. The largest protests usually take place in central Santiago. Police can use tear gas and water cannon against protesters. Other public demonstrations, often led by students or indigenous rights defenders, can occur around Chile. You should avoid all demonstrations.

The following Santiago districts have in the past been the focus of strong protests: the boroughs of:

Downtown university neighbourhoods can also be the location of large demonstrations which may become violent after dark. Please be particularly aware of possible disturbances in those areas.

Terrorism

There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks, although unlikely, could be indiscriminate, including in places visited by foreigners.

There are occasional acts of domestic terrorism by anarchist groups, mostly in Santiago, including the use of small explosive devices. Groups mainly target banks (ATMs) and public transport. Keep bags with you at all times, and report any suspicious behaviour or unattended packages to local authorities.

There is considered to be a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Find out more about the global threat from terrorism, how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack.

Local laws and customs

Consumption and possession of drugs is illegal and can lead to prison sentences.

Homosexuality is legal in Chile and is increasingly widely accepted socially, although much of Chilean society is conservative.

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

Local authorities have confirmed some cases of Dengue fever in Easter Island. You should take steps to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

There are good health facilities in Santiago and other major cities, but private clinics and hospitals are expensive. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation. 

Air pollution in Santiago during winter (June-September) is a major problem. You may suffer from eye irritation and respiratory problems.

There have been a number of confirmed cases of children contracting meningitis W135.

Only one hospital offers treatment on Easter Island and its facilities are limited.  Those suffering from serious illnesses or injuries are often flown by air ambulance to mainland Chile for treatment. Make sure your insurance covers this.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 131 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

If you are a British passport holder visiting Chile for less than 90 days, you do not need a visa. If you wish to stay longer, you should consult the nearest Chilean Embassy.  On arrival in Chile the immigration authorities will issue you with a ‘Tarjeta de Turismo - Tourist Card’, an A5 sized white form. You must retain this document and present it to immigration when you leave.

Once in Chile, if you decide to stay for 90 days or more, you should contact the Chilean Immigration Department located in San Antonio 580, Santiago. Telephone: 600 626 4222.

Passport validity

Your passport should be valid for the proposed duration of your stay. No additional period of validity beyond this is required.

Dual nationality

British-Chilean dual nationals must enter and leave Chile using their Chilean passport. Chilean entry and exit requirements for dual nationals may change without notice. For further information check with the Chilean Embassy.

Travelling with children   

Chile has strict requirements for the entry and exit of minors under the age of 18.

Children born in Chile require a Chilean passport to leave.

Children under 18 years old who are leaving Chile alone, with only one parent/guardian, with friends or relatives, or with a group must get authorisation to travel from the Chilean authorities before travel. You can get this authorisation from any ‘notaria’ in Chile.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Chile. Your ETD must be valid for the proposed duration of your stay.

Natural disasters

Earthquakes

Serious earthquakes are always a possibility in Chile. You should familiarise yourself with safety procedures in the event of an earthquake or tsunami, and take note of instructions in hotel rooms. Building regulations require new structures to take account of seismic risks. Safety measures are widely known and put into practice by national organisations and the local authorities. To learn more about what to do before, during and after an earthquake, see the website of the US Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Volcanoes

A chain of volcanoes erupted in the Puyehue and Los Lagos region (500 miles south of Santiago) in June 2011 and are still active. There is a continuing risk of eruptions in Chaiten in southern Chile, Llaima in the Conguillo National Park and Lascar in northern Chile.  The Copahue Volcano on the Argentina/Chile border also erupts periodically, causing local residents to be evacuated. If you’re travelling to these areas, monitor local media reports and follow the advice of the local authorities.

Money

ATMs are widely available.

Credit cards are accepted in most large shops and hotels. Dollar travellers’ cheques are more widely accepted than travellers’ cheques in other currencies. It is possible to transfer money from the UK to Chile through Western Union.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send us a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.

See also

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  • British Embassy Santiago

    Title:British Embassy
    Email:
    Address:

    Avda. El Bosque Norte 0125,
    Las Condes,
    Santiago
    Chile

    Contact: Telephone: 56 2 2370 4100
    Facsmile: 56 2 2370 4160
    Visiting:Monday to Thursday: 9am to 1pm and 2pm to 5:30pm
    Friday: 9am to 1pm

    The British Embassy and Consulate will be closed on Friday 14 April 2017.
    For any emergency involving a British citizen during holidays or out-of-office-hours, please contact +56 2 2370 4100 and your call will be properly re-directed.

    Consular enquiries
    chile.consulate@fco.gov.uk
    General enquiries
    embsan@britemb.cl
    Services:Citizenship Ceremony service (Documentary Services)
  • Department for International Trade Chile

    Title:Department for International Trade Chile
    Email:commercial.santiago@fco.gov.uk
    Address:

    British Embassy
    Avda. El Bosque Norte 0125
    Las Condes
    Santiago
    Chile

    Contact: General enquiries: +56 2 2370 4100
    Visiting:
    Services:

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